The culture of entitlement

6 Comments

Dealing with multi-faceted personalities is a full-time job. And when you work in an industry where you are surrounded by people all day, every day, that job becomes compounded by a plethora of drama, negotiation and, on many occasions, very warped senses of entitlement.

I’ll admit there are days when I feel a little bigger than my britches but I am firmly rooted in the reality in which I know I am replaceable. I am very good at my job but I do not hold any sense of a misguided belief the place where I work would not be able to go on without me.

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Sadly, many people do not follow my logic. The culture of entitlement is alive and well and thriving like a bacterial colony in a petri dish. And like any bacteria, entitlement grows, spreads and inevitably infects anything or anyone in its path. Those who feels a sense of comfort in their role may want to keep in mind there are many people who can slip into their shoes and potentially wear them better. A sense of entitlement changes people. It makes them act impulsively and show little regard for those around them. It drives a wedge between the entitled person and the people with whom they share the field of battle and, now, smaller wars are created within the bigger battle.

There is a very narcissistic quality to entitlement and those individuals feel they are more important than others. Their end goal is to feel like they have won and to feel superior to those around them. But all they have done is create a toxic work environment and lose the respect of their coworkers.

I have seen what a sense of entitlement can do to working relationships and to friendships. The pathogen of privilege is destructive and ugly, and it can forever change the relationship you have with those you work with. Be cognizant of others. Realize you are all on the same team. And, no matter how long you have maintained your job, work hard every day to prove you are part of that team and be humbled by the realization that you can be replaced.

 

6 thoughts on “The culture of entitlement

  1. Another great read and lesson. We all have egos and a responsibility to monitor and adjust daily. My biggest challenge in the military was coming home after long deployments to deprived and corrupt nations. Entitlement is rampant in the west. I’d become angry with our society and furious with myself. My hissy fits over a late pizza delivery were followed by shame as I recalled poverty I recently witnessed. Perspective and gratitude are essential to maintain my well being. I will slip up again and bitch about traffic while driving my sports car and need to self assess again. Fair treatment and choice are wonderful luxuries of our country. Thankfully we are ENTITLED 👍 to leave a toxic work environment if we choose.

      • Meh, it was initially a lark to travel but evolved into something more and meaningful. Your commendable contributions to your community is equally worthy of respect and admiration. We need more soldiers like you! ❤️J

  2. My dad used to say ‘no one is irreplaceable’ when we first started working while is high school. It was a good thing to keep in mind and kept us humble and grateful for the salary. Not everyone is a team player. Maybe a team building event would put a different spin on things!

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